Aviator Gear adopts Bald Eagle at Jacksonville Zoo

When Aviator Gear decided to adopt an animal from the Jacksonville Zoo, the decision was pretty much already made for us. With most of our clients in the military; flying aircraft with names like Eagle, Falcon, Global Hawk, Talon, Predator and Raptor; the choice was obvious.

Aviator Gear is proud to announce its newest team members, adopted from the Jacksonville Zoo, Athena and Titus, the Bald Eagles.

The Jacksonville Zoo currently has two Bald eagles. The oldest being a female named Athena. She is approximately 33 years old. Bald eagles have a life expectancy of 20 to 30 years in the wild and can live up to 50 years in captivity. Athena was originally found in Reynolds County, Missouri in 1985 and taken in by Dickerson Park Zoo. She already had adult plumage at the time she was found, and was believed to be at least 5 years old. Bald eagles typically get their iconic white head feathers anywhere from ages 4-6. She was transferred to the Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens in September of 1988. The other, younger eagle is a juvenile male named Titus. He is estimated to be about 4 years old. Titus was donated by Tina Jackson of Naval Air Station Jacksonville only a few months ago this year. He was put out on exhibit for the first time for Fourth of July. Keepers, Rachel Mead and Danielle Buck are working on training Titus. We are told his training is going very well. Both eagles are owned by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Some General Information About Bald Eagles:

Bald Eagles inhabit the lakes, seacoasts, reservoirs, rivers, and inland waters, highest of treetops, rocky hillsides, cliffs, and peaks of North America from Alaska to California and Florida.

Active during the day, they are opportunistic hunters who will often steal the prey of other raptors. They have a cruising speed of between 30-40 mph and can dive at a rate of up to 100 mph.

Bald Eagle nests are one of the largest nests of all birds, reaching 11 feet deep, 6 feet wide and weighing from several hundred pounds to as much as a ton! Breeding pairs return to their nest each year, adding materials and repairing them. Once paired, bald eagles remain together for life. Only upon death, will the survivor take a new mate. Bald Eagles usually lay two eggs, which will hatch in about 35 days. The young eaglets will leave the nest after eight to 14 weeks, and may return periodically.

Please join us in proudly welcoming Athena and Titus and The Jacksonville Zoo to the Aviator Gear Family!